GETTING INTO RESEARCH AND SRP 99



Research Opportunities

Please see the SRP 99 research opportunities below. These are great opportunities for students to work with faculty members on research projects.

Faculty members: if you would like to submit a research opportunity for students, please see Post SRP Research Positions.

Students: if you would like to apply for a research opportunity, please e-mail a cover letter and your CV to the contact listed on the position posting. Click here for a sample e-mail and sample CV. For additional information, see Finding a Research Project and Mentor, attend an SRP 99 workshop, or contact the Undergraduate Research Center–Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences.

Please note: The deadline for submission of all SRP contracts is 4:30pm on the Friday of Week 2 of each quarter in Murphy Hall A334.

In this project, I have collected party statutes/constitutions/rules that explain how political parties (1) nominate candidates to run for office, (2) allocate financial resources across the party, (3) set aside seats for different groups in society in the party leadership, (4) write the party platform/manifesto, and (5) select the party leader. This data covers 66 parties in 20 parliamentary democracies. I am now going back through and triple checking all the coding, following up in some cases with interviews, and organizing the data.

Responsibilities: The student would be in charge of helping me go through these files, creating a very clear codebook, contacting parties and setting up interviews, and other things related to the project. I need a student who is very organized, committed to working a set number of hours each week, and is a clear communicator. Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Preferred qualifications: Organization. High GPA. Recommendation from previous professors is a great benefit. Statistical background can only help! Computer programming would be great, but not necessary. Please feel free to contact me to discuss it in more detail at any time.

Hours per week: 2 units (ideally 10 hours/week, but I could go as low as 6 hours/week)

Positions available: 4

Quarters recruiting: Summer 2017

Faculty information:
Georgia Kernell, Communication Studies

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Georgia Kernell
E-mail: gkernell@ucla.edu

Website: http:\\www.georgiakernell.org.

For information on students who have helped with this project: http://www.georgiakernell.org/pol/

This three-year project collects oral histories of families living with food insecurity in Miami FL, Cedar Rapids IA, and South Los Angeles, and adapts those narratives into radio plays to be performed live in theaters around the country. We partner with arts organizations and social service agencies in all three locations to attract economically diverse audiences. Post-performance discussions facilitate the exchange of information and perspectives among community stakeholders.

Responsibilities: At this phase of the process, we will be devising three short radio plays based on the oral histories of food-insecure families. Students researchers will 1) assist with documenting and archiving rehearsals and planning sessions, 2) edit raw oral history transcripts and prepare them for donation to UCLA's Center for Oral History Research, 3) create a timeline of significant events in each family's narrative, 4) assist with organizing travel itineraries, 5) assist with general communication between all partner organizations, artists, and participating family members.

Preferred qualifications: Excellent skills in communication, organization, and typing; excellent writing mechanics; video and photo skills are helpful but not necessary.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours

Positions available: 2

Quarters recruiting:

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016 (1 position), Fall 2016 (2 positions), Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017.

Faculty information:
Dan Froot, World Arts and Cultures/Dance
Website: http://www.danfroot.com

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Dan Froot
E-mail: danfroot@me.com
The Tokyo War Crimes Trials, similar to the trials of Nazi war criminals held at Nuremberg, were held after the conclusion of the war to bring to justice senior Japanese politicians and army officials for war crimes and crimes committed against humanity. The International Military Tribunal for the Far East (IMTFE), as it is known, was however unable to deliver a unanimous judgment. Most (in)famously, the Indian Justice, Radha Binod Pal, found all the Japanese defendants, including former Japanese Prime Minister Tojo, not guilty. Justice Pal wrote a judgment of over 750 pages which is one of the more extraordinary and yet largely ignored legal and political documents of our times. Moreover, Pal is a celebrated figure all over Japan, championed ironically and rather uniquely both by the Japanese right-wing, which assumes that Justice Pal exonerated Japanese war criminals, which is far from being the truth, and by the Japanese left, which holds him up as an example of an anti-imperialist figure since he also speared the US and Britain for crimes of colonialism.


In this project, I seek the help of an undergraduate student who will help me track down, read, and translate articles on Pal in Japanese, though some more general research on Justice Pal will also be required.

Responsibilities: Any student applying for this position MUST be able to read Japanese fluently. Student will help the professor with his research on Justice Pal and identify pieces in the popular Japanese press (including newspapers such as Asahi Shimbun or Yoimuri Shimbun) and then translate some pieces into English in part.

Preferred Student Qualifications: Student must know Japanese, be able to use a research library (YRL) and work with Japanese newspapers.

Hours Per Week: 5-8 per week, during the summer, and 6-10 during the fall. Post begins Summer 2016.

Number of Positions Available: One

Quarter(s) recruiting: Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018

Faculty contact: Vinay Lal vlal@history.ucla.edu

The project is designed to improve the metadata in a large collection of audio files, so they become the searchable basis for community radio in Russia + beyond.

Responsibilities: This position is for two undergraduates to collaborate with a Comparative Literature professor on a music and metadata project. The tags within a very large collection of MP3s need to be double-checked and cleaned up. Using a software program very similar to iTunes, various fields need to be verified so that – for example – each song/composition is linked to an artist, album, and so forth. The great majority of these tags are already in place; the missing information simply needs to be cut, pasted, or moved from one column to another.

The central collection is housed on campus, but can be accessed from home. Since many of the MP3s come from Eastern Europe, very basic knowledge of the Russian language is required (simply to distinguish artist names from album titles, etc.).

Preferred qualifications: Knowledge (at least) of Russian alphabet.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours

Positions available: 10

Quarters recruiting: 

Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017



Faculty information:
David MacFadyen, Comparative Literature and Musicology
Website: http://www.farfrommoscow.com

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: David MacFadyen
E-mail: dmacfady@humnet.ucla.edu

A century ago American popular music was categorized in many ways such as the type of social group that it "belonged" to, the distinction between high brow and low brow, even the type of technology it was recorded on.  By the mid-twentieth century genres, that is, qualities of rhythm, melody, timbre, harmony, etc., was the most common form of categorization (jazz, country, rhythm and blues, rock 'n' roll, etc.). I am trying to explain how that system arose focusing on the role of technology, markets, institutions, culture, and social groups. Currently, the research is concentrating on the early twentieth century.

Responsibilities:

1. Identify and code mentions of specific genres in online newspapers and magazines, especially jazz, ragtime, and blues. This can be done on the student's own computer.

2. Read and take notes on secondary books and articles in sociology, history, and musicology.

Qualifications: Experience in using Excel. Social science major preferred but not necessary.

Hours per week:  10

Positions available: 3

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Faculty Information: William Roy, Sociology

If interested, please contact:

William Roy

billroy@soc.ucla.edu


Describe situations, using a list of descriptive statements (the Riverside Behavioral Q-Sort or RBQ), based on sets of brief audio recordings of study participants' everyday lives.

Responsibilities: Complete four RBQ sorts per week.

Qualifications: CITI training must be completed before students can have access to the data. No other requirements, but Psychology 10 or equivalent, and familiarity with Microsoft Excel, would be helpful.

Hours per week: 3 hours

Positions available: 7

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017

Faculty information:
Prof. Joseph H. Manson, Anthropology
Website: http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/anthro/faculty/jmanson

If you are interested, please contact:
Prof. Joseph H. Manson, Anthropology
jmanson@anthro.ucla.edu
Haines Hall 341
310-267-4337

Under the guidance of Professor Otto Santa Ana you will learn and apply critical discourse analysis in a metaphorical analysis as exemplified by Santa Ana’s monograph, Brown Tide Rising. Professor Santa Ana has worked with SRP before. This time around we will explore how the nation treats the unaccompanied child migrants that have come to our country.

The 2014 arrival of 65,000 unaccompanied child migrants, mostly from Central America, challenged US government capacity to respond to a humanitarian crisis. Our government has constitutional responsibilities to treat all individuals fairly, and self-imposed obligations to treat children with special care. Sadly, our government violated its own statutes by allowing 38,000 of these children to appear before an immigration judge without legal representation. A class-action lawsuit challenging the government's failure to provide children with legal representation.

We will study this federal lawsuit, JEFM v. Holder, comparing the language of the plaintiffs and defense, to gauge the legal and social status of such children in this country, not in public discourse, but where it matters for individual children.

Under Dr. Otto Santa Ana’s mentorship, you will learn how to conduct a critical discourse analysis of textual characterizations of the children of the civil rights plaintiffs and the government defendants. The proximal goal is to learn how to conduct inductive social science. A more ambitious goal is to present our findings at academic conferences, and to publish our findings in a peer-review scholarly journal.

Responsibilities:
1. Literature review: Read key literature on the method: Critical Discourse Analysis
2. Data Analysis in teams (under faculty supervision):
a. Select appropriate legal documents to review
b. Following strict inductive social science protocol, employ CDA on these documents
c. Develop a database of the analyzed items
3. Reporting
a. Oral presentation to other teams
b. Write up a report on your findings.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours

Positions available: 4

Quarters recruiting:  

Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017 (subject to change)

Faculty information:
Otto Santa Ana, Chicana/o Studies
Website: http://www.chavez.ucla.edu/content/otto-santa-ana

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Otto Santa Ana
E-mail: otto@ucla.edu

This is a digital project that uses a mix of oral histories, archival images, art, music and other items to unveil the multi-layers of indigenous LA and the connection to place.



Responsibilities: Students can help on current community maps content, archival work, GIS work, educational material, or blog material. Depending on the student's major, any or one of these are available in this extensive interdisciplinary project.



Preferred qualifications: One of these: GIS, Archival, Communications, Web Design, Artist, Storytelling, Community work.



Hours per week: 3-5 hours (1 unit) or 6-10 hours (2 units)



Positions available: 5



Quarters recruiting

: Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018



Faculty information:

Mishuana Goeman, Gender Studies and American Indian Studies

Website: http://mila.ss.ucla.edu/



If you are interested, please contact:

Name: Mishuana Goeman

E-mail: goeman@gender.ucla.edu / mappingindigenousLA@gmail.com



Research Description: The Early Childhood Core of the UCLA Nathanson Family Resilience Center seeks undergraduate students to assist on a research study for Head Start families. 

Qualifications: Motivated and committed students who have completed relevant coursework in psychology, early childhood education, or related field and are interested in working on a study involving families with young children and learning about the research process. Must be responsible, mature, highly organized, demonstrate the ability to produce excellent work, and have a can-do attitude. 

Responsibilities: Student RAs are needed to assist with research study efforts. This includes transcribing and coding parent interviews, coding video-taped parent-child interactions, and scoring preschool-aged children's self-regulation tasks. Student RAs will be working with our team of psychologists and early childhood research specialists. 

Hours Per Week: 6-8 hours per week (2 units) (hours available Monday-Thursday 9am-4pm)

Quarter(s) recruiting: Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018

Contact Info: PI/Faculty: Blair Paley, PhD; Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences; 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024; Phone: 310-206-5254

If you would like to join our research team please email a cover letter, CV and your anticipated availability to Clare and Jolie at RPS@mednet.ucla.edu 

Research description: We investigate whether Italian municipalities that have been hardly bombed during WWII received more funding and increased their spending.

Responsibilities: Internet search

Preferred Qualifications: Very good knowledge of Italian

Hours per week: 5

Positions Available: 1

Quarters recruiting: Winter 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017

Faculty Information: Michela Giorcelli, Economics
Website: http://www.giorcellimichela.com

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Michela Giorcelli
E-mail: mgiorcelli@econ.ucla.edu

Research Description: Eliquis is a new anticoagulant drug that many patients are beginning to use to treat and/or help prevent blood clots that could lead to death through stroke or pulmonary embolism. These same patients are taking over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and dietary supplements that could have serious interactions with Eliquis, but they may not understand the potential risks or tell their doctors about what they're taking. This study will evaluate patient awareness of interactions between Eliquis and OTC drugs or dietary supplements through semi-structured interviews with patients taking Eliquis. Students are needed who can conduct these interviews in Mandarin/Cantonese.

Qualifications: Fluency in Mandarin/Cantonese required. Background in Sociology, Anthropology, or qualitative research methods preferred. Detail-oriented. 

Responsibilities: Complete training in HIPAA regulations and patient privacy/confidentiality. Work with the project coordinator to practice and conduct interviews (in English). Coordinate with recruited patients' schedules, including weekdays or weekends when necessary. Conduct and audio-record 10-15 interviews with patients in Mandarin/Cantonese. Follow HIPAA-regulated protocol for storage and deletion of interview recordings in a timely manner. Verify accuracy of transcriptions and translations. Perform other project specific tasks as needed (e.g. uploading of audio recordings for transcription, literature reviews). Meet with PI/faculty mentor and project coordinator throughout the quarter.

Hours Per Week: 2-5

Number of Positions Available: 1

Quarter(s) recruiting: Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Contact Info: PI/Faculty: Derjung Mimi Tarn, MD, PhD; Family Medicine; 10880 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 1800, Los Angeles, CA 90024; Phone: 310-794-8242; Email: dtarn@mednet.ucla.edu; Website: http://www.gouclafamilymed.org/faculty/

If you are interested please contact:
Name: Amanda McArthur

Phone: 310-794-8242

Email: amcarthur@mednet.ucla.edu

Research description: Using evidence from WWII, we investigate the long-term effects of management and technology transfers

Responsibilities: Proof-reading

Preferred Qualifications: Basic knowledge of econometrics

Hours per week: 10

Positions Available: 2

Quarters recruiting: Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017

Faculty Information: Michela Giorcelli, Economics
Website: http://www.giorcellimichela.com

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Michela Giorcelli
E-mail: mgiorcelli@econ.ucla.edu

Under the mentorship of Dr. Robert Chao-Romero, and supervision of Chicana/o Studies doctoral candidate, Kendy Rivera, MA, CPhil, undergraduate students will learn skills and techniques to conduct qualitative data analysis in Spanish and English.

Responsibilities: Undergraduate students will learn and gain experience conducting qualitative data analysis for a bilingual (Spanish and English) interview collection. Student researchers will learn how to analyze ethnographic research and qualitative interviews, and have a fundamental role in the IRB approved (07/16-#15-001062) study "Del Otro Lado/From the Other Side: Tijuana-San Diego Transborder Flexible Citizenship." Learned skills and responsibilities include: 1) managing data (filing and keeping track and organization of respondent files); 2) reducing data (transcribing audio recording data in Spanish; and, 3) Coding (Thematic and Profiles). Student researchers are expected to be fully bilingual in Spanish and English. Bicultural preferred (Mexican, Chicana/o, Latina/o).

Preferred qualifications: Type +40 wpm; previous experience/familiarity with interview transcribing and/or coding (not required); bilingual (Spanish and English and/or Spanglish); bicultural; Spanish, Chicana/o Studies, Sociology, Education, Political Science majors; access to high-speed internet, laptop/desktop; availability to meet weekly and/or biweekly.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours

Positions available: 2

Quarters recruiting: Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Faculty information:
Robert Chao-Romero, Chicana/o Studies

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Robert Chao-Romero
E-mail: rcromero@chavez.ucla.edu

Research Description: Lasting changes in gene expression facilitate formation of powerful drug-related memories that contribute to animal models of addiction such as reinstatement. However, less is known about how such gene expression changes impact learning and memory more broadly, outside of drug-seeking and taking, in addicted individuals. This gap in knowledge might contribute to treatment difficulty.

Our lab has shown that animals treated and withdrawn from cocaine exhibit a bias to solve a maze task utilizing the dorsolateral striatal (DLS) memory system where drug-naïve controls utilize the hippocampal (HC) memory system. This memory system bias correlates with differential gene expression within the DLS and the HC.

Ongoing research in this project is exploring the epigenetic and circuit contributions to this bias with molecular techniques such as qRTPCR, western blott, and virus-mediated over-expression, coupled with a maze-based behavioral assay.

Responsibilities: Student researchers will care for and weigh rats, and assist with injections and surgeries. With demonstration of responsibility and competence, student researchers will be conduct molecular techniques.

Preferred Student Qualifications: Excellent attention to detail, initiative, and responsibility. All skills will be trained.

Hours Per Week: 10 hours per week

Number of Positions Available: Two

Quarter(s) recruiting: Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Lab Primary Investigator: Pamela Kennedy, Assistant Professor; Dept: Psychology

If you are interested please contact:
Name: Eric Harvey, M.A.

Email: psyHarvey@ucla.edu

Include a brief cover letter in the body of the email, and attach a resume. 

Research show that if retrieval of a fear memory is disrupted and updated, the conditioned fear memory is erased provided that the conditioned stimulus is non-fear relevant. Given that fear relevant conditioned stimulus are resistant to extinction, there is a need to explore whether complementing extinction with other appropriate training such as reevaluation may help to prevent the return of fear.

This 3 day feasibility study seeks to explore whether a sensory based mindful calm training as a re-evaluation training can facilitate extinction training to overcome the conditioned fear memory involving a conditioned fear relevant stimulus.

Responsibilities: Online screening, administering consent form, administering self-report questionnaires, administering fear acquisition computerized training, administering extinction and reevaluation mindful calm computerized training, and finally administrating computerized tests to determine whether fear has been erased.

Hours per week: 3 hours

Positions available: 3-4

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017

Faculty information:
Helen Lavertsky and Lobsang Rapgay, Psychiatry

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Lobsang Rapgay, PhD
E-mail: lrapgay@mednet.ucla.edu

Research Assistants will assist in developing and administering a survey to identify which assigned reading social science courses have had the greatest impact on students.

Responsibilities:

• Work with team to develop survey
• Recruit participants
• Assist with analysis of results

Preferred Student Qualifications:
Ideal candidates will be majoring in a social science discipline

Student Hours Per Week (1 unit = 3-5 hours / 2 units = 6-10 hours)
1 or 2 units

Number of Positions Available: 5

Quarter(s) Recruiting:
Summer 2016
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017

If you are interested, please contact:

Juliet Williams
Gender Studies and Social Sciences IDP
E-mail: jawilliams@gender.ucla.edu


Research assistants will assist in developing, administering, and analyzing the results of a survey designed to assess faculty and student expectations and experiences in lecture format courses.

Responsibilities:
• Work with team to develop survey
• Recruit participants
• Assist with analysis of results

Preferred Student Qualifications:
Ideal candidates will be majoring in a social science discipline; however, all interested students are encouraged to apply

Student Hours Per Week (1 unit = 3-5 hours / 2 units = 6-10 hours):
1 or 2 units

Number of Positions Available:
8

Quarter(s) Recruiting:
Summer 2016
Fall 2016
Winter 2017
Spring 2017

If you are interested, please contact:
Juliet Williams
Gender Studies and Social Sciences IDP
E-mail: jawilliams@gender.ucla.edu

Project examines the role of Race/Ethnicity, Class and Satisfaction with Local Public Goods and Services and the extent to which these views influence political participation.

Responsibilities:
1. Literature review: survey past and contemporary literature on race and satisfaction with local goods and services at the local level.
2. Data Analysis: help analyze basic patterns in the census and other survey data sources.

Preferred qualifications:
Familiarity with political science, economics or history
Knowledge of Excel and ideally STATA
Endnote
Attention to detail
Organization skills

Hours per week: 6-10 hours

Positions available: 2

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017

Faculty information:
Lorrie Frasure-Yokley, Political Science
Website: http://lorriefrasureyokley.com

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Lorrie Frasure-Yokley
E-mail: lfrasure@polisci.ucla.edu
This exciting project will work with two community agencies who work with racial/ethnic minority youth (African American, Latino, and Asian) to develop radio programming led by them. In our work with the community agency, we will help the adolescents to select research articles with the theme of “living to do well,” in which they will, in a 3-5 minute segment, share the result of the research with the radio audience. We will design an evaluation to determine the impact of the segment on health literacy and health behavior change.

Responsibilities: Meet with the students and obtain ideas about their interests and community needs; develop an evaluation for student learning, the impact in the community, and the SRP learning changes; teach the students the materials in the articles and help them design a 3-5 minute radio segment.

Preferred qualifications: Students must have a health and science background, must be able to read scientifically published articles that appear in health and medicine journals, and must have at least a 3.0 GPA.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours (2 units)

Positions available: 6

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Faculty information:
Vickie Mays, Psychology and Public Health
Website: www.MinorityHealthDisparities.org

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Vickie Mays
E-mail: mays@ucla.edu
This interview study is interested in how experiences of racism in African American men 18-24 and 40-64 result in negative health and emotional outcomes. African American men are interviewed by professional interviewers assessing experiences of racial discrimination and the men’s response.

Responsibilities: Three students are being recruited for this project who will work with the interviewers to transfer and translate the interviews using Dragon software. Students will also recruit in various communities areas men 18-24, 40-64. Students will help define the themes using qualitative techniques, input data from quantitative measures, and work with researchers on producing posters and articles.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours

Positions available: 3

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Faculty information:
Vickie Mays, Psychology and Public Health
Website: www.MinorityHealthDisparities.org

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Vickie Mays
E-mail: mays@ucla.edu
The purpose of this study is to develop, from literature reviews, meeting with experts, and working with the study consultants, identification of non-traditional characteristics of minority students who want to pursue careers in medicine, STEM, and allied health.

Responsibilities: Students will help collect data, interview individuals in the field, organize meetings to share information, and assist with the writing of a questionnaire.

Preferred qualifications: Prefer students in a health program, education, or some form of curriculum development. Must have at least a 3.0 GPA.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours (2 units)

Positions available: 4

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Faculty information:
Vickie Mays, Psychology and Public Health
Website: www.MinorityHealthDisparities.org

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Vickie Mays
E-mail: mays@ucla.edu
There are a number of studies that examine race-based discrimination and attempt to identify the mechanisms involved with the processes of discrimination. Students on this project will perform literature reviews identifying the research, making a chart that indicates the findings and developing slides to illustrate the findings.

Responsibilities: Students will read, summarize, and make charts and PowerPoints on the published studies on race-based mental health disorders.

Preferred qualifications: Must have had statistics and some other quantitative course and achieved a B+ or better in the course. Must be a social science major with some knowledge about mental health.

Hours per week: 6-10 hours (2 units)

Positions available: 2

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2017

Faculty information:
Vickie Mays, Psychology and Public Health
Website: www.MinorityHealthDisparities.org

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Vickie Mays
E-mail: mays@ucla.edu
In this research project, we study the long-term consequences of orphanhood in Cambodia. We have collected survey data and are now in the process of “cleaning” the data in order to produce the analytical datasets that researchers will be able to use to assess whether individuals who lost a parent during childhood differ from those who did not.

Responsibilities: Under the supervision of the Project”s Database Manager, the Research Assistant will analyze inconsistencies in the database and assess which corrections to apply. Upon completion of this process, analytical datasets will be extracted from the database. The Research Assistant will be responsible for an analysis and reporting of data quality, and time permitting, will provide the first descriptive statistics of the extracted data sets.

Preferred qualifications: The candidates should be familiar with STATA, R or another statistical package. They should have advance MS Word, Excel skills. An understanding of databases, ODBC and SQL is desirable but not required.

Hours per week: 3-10 hours (1 or 2 units)

Positions available: 3

Quarters recruiting: Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

Faculty information:
Patrick Heuveline, Sociology

If you are interested, please contact:
Name: Patrick Heuveline
E-mail: heuveline@soc.ucla.edu